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Topic: Aging


Why Am I Shrinking?

It is true...as we age we lose some height. Some of it is caused as the disks between the vertebrae of the spine dry out and become thinner, with the result that the spine becomes compressed. The bone loss known as osteoporosis can also contribute. On the positive side, those who exercise, strengthening their core, may retain or gain height through better posture. And some research, while not definitive, has offered promising evidence that yoga may even help reverse the curving of the spine. And make sure you are getting enough calcium and vitamin D. If exercise isn't your thing, you can always ask the doctor to measure you lying down!


Boomer Women vs. the Cosmetics Industry

Boomer women are very disappointed with the cosmetics industry, according to this article. Women continue to feel beautiful as they age, but want some help with issues that accompany aging: yellowing teeth, hair color, skin texture, and uneven skin tone. Yet, the cosmetics people seem to think that this group of women only care about anti-aging skincare products, whose effectiveness is the hardest to prove. To read more about what women actually want from the "beauty" industry, click here.


Exercise Improves Attitudes about Aging

We have all heard about how important it is to exercise, especially as we age. What we probably haven't considered is that exercise can actually improve a person's attitude toward aging and make them feel happier and fulfilled. The researchers gathered 240 sedentary women from ages 70 to 93. They were divided into three groups and were studied over a 6-month period, with the first group following an exercise routine, the second learning computer skills, and the third going about their lives as usual. By the end of the program, the physical exercise group showed significant improvement in their positive attitude toward getting older compared to those in the other groups. The findings are illuminating and very positive... keep reading for the details.


"Unfriending" May be a Healthy Act

Well-known age 50+ author Suzanne Braun Levine takes on the question of how to shed old friends and keep those that enhance our lives as she is researching her new book, "Why Your Girlfriends Are Good for Your Health." She confirms the increasingly meaningful role that friends play as women age and face transitions. But, research also suggests that while supportive, intimate friendships are life-enhancing, toxic or simply tired friendships are a drain on our well-being. So, she posits, unfriending is as important as a daily workout. Add your thoughts on this topic in the comment section of this Huffington Post blog.


Finding the Right Notes

Returning to an old love, playing the piano, was transformational for this age 50 plus woman who needed something to stave off the loneliness of widowhood. This story isn't just about picking up the pieces, or in this case, finding the right notes. It is about choosing to learn something new as an adult, realizing that you don't have to be perfect, re-establishing discipline in your life, keeping your mental faculties alive, slowing down, savoring...and probably most important of all, having fun. An inspirational story!


Ideas for Retirement Checklist

As retirement gets closer, the checklist of what you need to think about might need review. This article lists a number of areas that you may not have considered, including doing home repairs while still working, looking into your tax situation, taking advantage of your present health benefits, and living on your projected retirement income while still employed. And after you've looked at this list, perhaps you want to add a "bucket" for how you might "give back" to your community in this next phase of life. For that, you can contact comingofage.org. To read more, click here.


Planning for Aging with Dignity

As people age and their health begins to decline, it can be difficult for family members to discuss topics such as personal finances and future living arrangements. A new online guide, "Ten Conversations to Plan for Aging with Dignity and Independence" published by The SCAN Foundation, offers tools to help older adults plan for their future. According to the guide, 70% of people 65 and older will need help with activities at some point in their lives. This useful resource can be accessed in English and Spanish.

 





Who Are You Calling Elderly?

Topics: News, Ageism, Aging

What should we call people age 65 and older? Are they “seniors,” "older adults," "the elderly?"  The author of this article "unscientifically" interviewed professionals in the "aging" field to help clarify the word(s) to describe people of a certain age. Among those queried are Harry (Rick) Moody, 67, director of academic affairs for AARP, Jane Glen Haas, 74, nationally-syndicated newspaper columnist, and Dr. John Rowe, 67, chairman of the MacArthur Foundation Research Network on an Aging Society. To weigh in on this touchy topic, check out the Philadelphia-based blog, Elder Chicks


Who Are You Calling Elderly?

Topics: Ageism, Aging

What should we call people age 65 and older? Are they “seniors,” "older adults", "the elderly?" The author of this article "unscientifically" interviewed professionals in the "aging" field to help clarify the word(s) to describe people of a certain age. Among those queried are Harry (Rick) Moody, 67, director of academic affairs for AARP, Jane Glen Haas, 74, nationally-syndicated newspaper columnist, and Dr. John Rowe, 67, chairman of the MacArthur Foundation Research Network on an Aging Society. To weigh in on this touchy topic, check out the Philadelphia-based blog, Elder Chicks


De-Clutter...De-Sooner, De-Better

For the person who is facing a move and needs to downsize or for anyone who has reached the point where there is just too much "stuff" in their lives, this article will speak to you...and provide tips on how to make real progress in changing the way you live. A motivational speaker quoted in the article talks about expanding the definition of "tchotchkes," a Yiddish word for knicknacks, to mean "stuff that gets out of control" and can be anything, mental or physical, that is unneeded or unwanted (examples might be electronic equipment, people who are an emotional drain and don't bring joy, or gifts that you never liked from people you do.)