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Topic: exercise


Top 5 Boomer Health Trends

Last month, CNN took an in-depth look at baby boomers and came up with the top five trends in health and wellness for those born between 1946 and 1964: boomeritis (high rates of tendinitis, arthritis, tears, and fractures); the positives of brain games in improving memory and attention; increase in sexually-transmitted diseases; hepatitus C (often undiagnosed); and free preventive care for hepatitus, mammograms, counseling services, flu shots, and other kinds of care that are covered by most insurance plans. To learn more about each of these areas and see an informative video, click here.


Exercise Improves Attitudes about Aging

We have all heard about how important it is to exercise, especially as we age. What we probably haven't considered is that exercise can actually improve a person's attitude toward aging and make them feel happier and fulfilled. The researchers gathered 240 sedentary women from ages 70 to 93. They were divided into three groups and were studied over a 6-month period, with the first group following an exercise routine, the second learning computer skills, and the third going about their lives as usual. By the end of the program, the physical exercise group showed significant improvement in their positive attitude toward getting older compared to those in the other groups. The findings are illuminating and very positive... keep reading for the details.


Exercise...and Cut Down on Sitting

It probably comes as no surprise that the more time someone spends sitting, especially in front of the television, the "less robust" his or her life may be. One recent study isolated the effect that sitting has on people’s life spans and the findings were sobering: every single hour of TV watched after the age of 25 reduces the viewer’s life expectancy by 21.8 minutes. So, consider cutting back on TV time and look at the rest of your day and find ways to walk, stand, and move around more, even if you are in an office. This article points out that sitting less doesn't take the place of exercise. Both are needed to maintain good health. 

 


Changing the Tune on Exercise

If you are told to exercise because it will help you fend off obesity, disease, or old age, you probably won't find your way off the couch. The latest research strongly suggests that we stop thinking of future health and consider how keeping active today will enhance our current well-being and happiness. Whatever you choose to do...a walk, a bike ride, going to the gym...has to fit into your schedule and have immediate benefits. Keep reading for more on how this "new tune" for exercise will get you into your Zumba togs and keep you going back for more.

 


Changing the Tune on Exercise

If you are told to exercise because it will help you fend off obesity, disease, or old age, you probably won't find your way off the couch. The latest research strongly suggests that we stop thinking of future health and consider how keeping active today will enhance our current well-being and happiness. Whatever you choose to do...a walk, a bike ride, going to the gym...has to fit into your schedule and have immediate benefits. Keep reading for more on how this "new tune" for exercise will get you into our zumba togs and keep you going back for more.

 


Are You Heart Smart?

There is so much information around about what it takes to keep your heart healthy that it is hard to know what is actually true and what can possibly be dangerous. How do you make decisions about what to eat, how much to exercise, and how to evaluate medical advice? This article is an interview with two cardiology experts who have written a book to help people make smarter choices about their health. There are lots of good questions answered and a quiz to test your knowledge. This article is a "keeper."


Talk About Inspiring!

This YouTube video makes you want to put your sneakers on, grab a few weights, and work as hard as you can to look like Ernestine Shepherd, the teacher. This extraordinarily fit 72-year-old with a shelf of trophies for bragging rights, runs 80 miles a week and teaches classes at the United Methodist Church in Baltimore for older women who try to follow her every step. Her can-do spirit, warmth, and encouragement make her students feel that they, too, can look and feel their best.


Bulking Up: An Ageless Phenomenon

We know that as we age, our muscle mass decreases at a pretty rapid rate. But, don't despair. New research published in the journal, Medicine & Science In Sports & Exercise, reports that this loss can be turned around with a very doable weight lifting, muscle stretching regimen. This NPR article and video follows a 73-year-old woman with osteoporosis around the gym...and provides evidence that stretching muscles through resistance exercises not only builds strength, but improves balance, which helps prevent falls. 


Getting Ready for 100

No one can honestly say that they don't experience any physical changes as they age. The focus of this New York Times article is to own up to reality and consider making a few "tweaks" and "course corrections" throughout the years to keep yourself in shape for a blow-out 100th birthday!  Simple exercises to strengthen your body and some changes in home environment to stress safety and ease of use can make a real difference.


No Gain in Pain

 

The norm is to report to the physical therapist after you've tried to recapture your glory days as a high school runner and end up limping to work in excruciating pain. How about visiting the doctor before you exercise? This Wall Street Journal article talks about the positive results of a proactive, preventive visit to a physical therapist who can diagnose muscle imbalances and provide a regime that corrects problems that effect endurance, balance, strength and weight control. With age comes wisdom ... and the physical therapist.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424...